Cessna
C180
Skywagon

Photo: Robert Deering 6/24/2007
Weatherford Municipal Airport
Weatherford, Texas
The Cessna 180 is a four- or six-seat, fixed conventional gear general aviation airplane which was produced between 1953 and 1981. Though the design is no longer in production, many of these aircraft are still in use as personal aircraft and in utility roles such as bush flying.

Cessna introduced the heavier and more powerful 180 as a complement to the Cessna 170. It eventually came to be known as the Skywagon.

In all its versions, 6,193 Cessna 180s were manufactured.  In 1956, a tricycle gear version of this design was introduced as the Cessna 182, which came to bear the name Skylane. Additionally, in 1960, Cessna introduced a heavier, more powerful sibling to the 180, the conventional gear Cessna 185. For a time, all three versions of the design were in production. 

General characteristics

  • Crew: one
  • Capacity: five passengers
  • Length: 25 ft 9 in (7.85 m)
  • Wingspan: 35 ft 10 in (10.92 m)
  • Height: 7 ft 9 in (2.36 m)
  • Wing area: 174 sq ft (16.2 m2)
  • Empty weight: 1,700 lb (771 kg)
  • Gross weight: 2,800 lb (1,270 kg)
  • Powerplant: 1 Continental O-470-U , 230 hp (170 kW)
  • Propellers: 2-bladed constant speed, 6 ft 10 in (2.08 m) diameter

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 148 kn (170 mph; 274 km/h)
  • Cruise speed: 142 kn (163 mph; 263 km/h)
  • Stall speed: 48 kn (55 mph; 89 km/h)
  • Range: 890 nmi (1,024 mi; 1,648 km)
  • Service ceiling: 17,700 ft (5,400 m)
  • Rate of climb: 1,100 ft/min (5.6 m/s)

Source: Wikipedia 

Flying the Spirit of Columbus, Geraldine Mock became the first woman to pilot an aircraft around the world.  A used Cessna 180 was purchased for this flight, additional fuel tanks were installed, and survival equipment added. She departed from Columbus, Ohio, on March 19, 1964, and arrived back home on April 17, 1964, after flying 36,964 kilometers (23,103 miles) in 29 days, 11 hours, and 59 minutes. Mock wrote about her exceptional solo flight in Three Eight Charlie.

Source: Smithsonian National Air & Space Museum


Spirit of Columbus
Photo: Robert Deering 10/23/2006
Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum
Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center
Chantilly, Virginia